Quality Choices for Early Childhood Education and Child Care in Union Parish

6 months

1 Year

2 Years

3 Years

4 Years

​• Talk sing and play with your baby “face to face.”
• Give baby time to play on the floor. Tummy Time helps baby to build up the muscles he/she needs to be able to sit up, crawl and walk.
• Offer your baby simple toys like rattles or baby links to reach for and hold.
​• Name toys, everyday objects and people as you go through the daily routines.
• Read books, newspapers, even grocery ads & be a tool for learning new words and develop a connection between spoken words to everyday objects.
• Stack canned goods or create homemade blocks out of leftover packaging such as; tissue boxes, mac-n-cheese boxes, etc.

• Talk to your baby about what they do and about what you are doing as you go through the daily routines.
• Offer small crackers or cereal pieces in a shallow bowl to encourage baby to use thumb and index finger.
• At meal times give baby a spoon to hold even if they play with it at first.
• Wave bye and blow kisses with baby.


• Name toys, everyday objects and people as you go through the daily routines.
• Read books, newspapers, even grocery ads & be a tool for learning new words and develop a connection between spoken words to everyday objects.
• Stack canned goods or create homemade blocks out of leftover packaging such as; tissue boxes, mac-n-cheese boxes, etc.

• In the car point out shapes, letters & colors that they see along the way.
• Sing songs & make up stories with your child. Let your child fill in what will happen next in the story.
• Play turn taking games- ex. rolling a ball back & forth.
• Play bubbles with your child encourage your child to jump up to pop them.
• Let your child go up & down steps rather than picking up.


School Readiness

School readiness is more than knowing letters and numbers. There are only 2,000 days between the time a baby is born and when that child shows up for the first day of kindergarten. Experiences during these 2,000 days have a lasting impact on later learning, health and success.

School Readiness requires access to opportunities

  • All families of young children need access to resources that will allow them to give their children the  relationships and experiences that promote school readiness.
  • High-quality early education programs provide the foundation for school readiness and must be available to all young children and families.
  • Early intervention efforts support children who may be at risk for later school failure.  These efforts are most effective when they offer many services rather than simply addressing isolated skills.


School Readiness must be broadly defined

  • Young children develop in different ways and at different rates.  Readiness does not happen at the same time or in the same way for all children. 
  • All areas of children’s development and learning must be included in talking about readiness.  Readiness is more than basic knowledge of learning to read and do math, important as these are.  Readiness includes all areas: physical, cognitive, social, and emotional competence as well as positive attitudes toward learning.
  • Readiness is much more than a child’s readiness.  Readiness includes ready children, ready families, ready communities, ready early care and education, and ready schools.  All are necessary so that all children will experience success.  


A Kindergarten Child:

  • Has self-confidence
  • Is friendly
  • Develops relationships with peers and adults
  • Concentrates and persists on challenging tasks
  • Effectively communicates
  • Listens to instructions and solves problems
  • Solves social problems himself/herself
  • Pays attention


Help your baby get ready for school

As the parent of a young child you want to prepare your child for school. Preparing your child for school really starts very early. You are your child’s first and most important teacher! Here are a few simple and fun activities you can do at home to prepare your child for school.